World Rugby “Hall Of Fame”

Here is the the Full List of World Rugby Hall Of Fame Inductees ….

Introduction

The World Rugby Hall of Fame honours players and administrators who have enhanced the Game of Rugby through their exceptional achievements.

Players, teams, administrators, coaches, referees, media and Rugby personalities alike will all be considered based on their outstanding contribution to the Game.

To be eligible for consideration in the World Rugby Hall of Fame, inductees should meet the following criteria:

  • Retired from playing and coaching international Rugby for at least three years
  • Made an outstanding contribution to the Game of Rugby
  • Demonstrated Rugby’s core values are Passion, Integrity, Solidarity, Discipline and Respect both on and off the field.

The World Rugby Hall of Fame Panel, Chaired by World Rugby Chairman Bernard Lapasset includes Gerald Davies, Nigel Starmer-Smith, Henri Garcia, Don Cameron and Pablo Mamone and Panel Secretary Chris Thau.

(Latest to first – with full links back to the World Rugby)

Inductees

  • 2014 Inductee: Graham Mourie

    Graham Neil Kenneth Mourie, born 8th September 1952 in New Zealand, is a former New Zealand flanker and coach of the Hurricanes. Mourie was the epitome of leading by example, captaining the All Blacks through the late 1970’s to the early 80’s. In total Mourie played 61 games for the All Blacks, captaining the team 57 times. Mourie was an unsettled back row forward whose work ethic was second to none, under his astute captaincy , the New Zealanders demonstrated a near water-tight defence conceding just one try in their four internationals, with sports betting professionals and pundits agreeing Graham Mourie was of the key game changers.

    In 1981, Graham Neil Kenneth Mourie was recognised for his services to rugby, and was given the prestigious award of becoming a member of the order of the British Empire.

    Graham Mourie played 21 Tests for the All Blacks and led the side on the historic Grand Slam tour of Britain and Ireland in 1978.


     

    • 2014 Inductee: Gill BurnsFormer England captain Gill Burns played in four Women’s Rugby World Cups, including the win in 1994. 

    • 2014 Inductee: Bill Beaumont

      Bill Beaumont captained England to Grand Slam glory in 1980, the same year he led the British & Irish Lions on the tour to South Africa.

    • 2014 Inductee: Jason Leonard

      Rugby World Cup winner Jason Leonard is England’s most-capped player and remains a hugely respected figure throughout the game.

    • 2014 Inductee: Ieuan Evans

      Wing wizard Ieuan Evans produced some wonderful moments of magic for Wales and the British & Irish Lions in the 1980s and 90s.

    • 2014 Inductee: Keith Wood

      An Irish rugby icon who captained his country with distinction and played a major role in both the 1997 and 2001 Lions tours.

    • 2014 Inductee: Jo Maso

      Jo Maso served France with distinction as both a player and team manager, winning a combined total of five Grand Slams.

    • 2014 Inductee: Michael Lynagh

      A Rugby World Cup winner in 1991, Michael Lynagh was the leading point-scorer in Test rugby at the time of his retirement.

    • 2014 Inductee: JPR Williams

      Wales and Lions legend JPR Williams became one of the most recognisable and revered figures in sport during the 1970s.

    • 2014 Inductee: Jim Greenwood

      Former Scotland captain & British Lion and great rugby thinker who continues to influence coaching to this day through his book Total Rugby.

    • 2014 Inductee: Keith Rowlands

      A Welsh rugby figure of real stature, respected throughout the world of rugby as both a player and administrator.

    • 2014 inductee – Farah Palmer

      Farah Palmer led the Black Ferns to three world crowns, in 1998, 2002 and 2006, making her the most successful captain in the women’s game.

    • 2014 Inductee: Anna Richards

      Anna Richards won 49 caps, an all-time Black Ferns record, in a stellar playing career that spanned almost two decades of continuous service

    2014 Inductee: Gill BurnsFormer England captain Gill Burns played in four Women’s Rugby World Cups, including the win in 1994. 

  • 2014 Inductee: Sir Terry McLean

    Terry McLean became the finest reporter of New Zealand rugby for more than half a century.

    One of 11 legends inducted into the IRB Hall of Fame at a special ceremony in Auckland on 21 August 2014. These inductions represent the incorporation into the IRB Hall of Fame following the acquisition of the International Rugby Hall of Fame.

    A legendary New Zealand sports writer and author who started as a journalist on the Auckland Sun in 1930, Terry McLean became the finest reporter of New Zealand rugby for more than half a century. Together his 32 books tell the story of every incoming tour to New Zealand and many All Black trips overseas.

    After his distinguished career as a rugby correspondent and sports editor of the New Zealand Herald, in 1996 McLean became the only New Zealand sports journalist to be knighted for services to sporting journalism.

  • 2014 Inductee: Grant Fox

    A true pioneer of modern kicking, Grant Fox is still regarded as one of the finest goal-kickers of all time.

  • 2014 Inductee: Fred Allen

    Fred ‘The Needle’ Allen had a 100 per cent record as All Blacks coach with 14 wins from 14 Tests in charge.

  • 2014 Inductee: Sir John Kirwan

    John Kirwan was one of the stars of the inaugural Rugby World Cup in 1987 on home soil in New Zealand.

  • 2014 Inductee: Ian Kirkpatrick

    Ian Kirkpatrick is one of the few forwards to score a century of tries in first-class games in New Zealand.

  • 2014 Inductee: Michael Jones

    Michael Jones was the first player to score a try in Rugby World Cup history with his score against Italy in 1987.

  • 2014 Inductee: Sean Fitzpatrick

    A Rugby World Cup winner in 1987, former All Black captain Sean Fitzpatrick was a product of a powerful Auckland side.

  • 2014 Inductee: Don Clarke

    A legend of Waikato rugby, Don Clarke played 31 Tests among his 89 matches for New Zealand.

  • 2014 Inductee: George Nepia

    George Nepia is remembered as an exceptional full back and one of the most famous Maori rugby players of all time.

  • 2014 Inductee: Sir Colin Meads

    Widely regarded as one a true icon of New Zealand and world rugby.

  • 2013 Inductee: Alfred St. George Hamersley
  • (8 October 1848 – 25 February 1929)
  • Was a nineteenth-century solicitor and entrepreneur of great renown, an English MP and perhaps most notably an English rugby union international who played in the first ever international match, went on to captain his country and pioneered the sport in the south of New Zealand and in British Columbia.
  • 2013 Inductee:Thomas Lawton
  • Born: 1899, in Waterford, Queensland, Australia.
  • Died: 1978
  • Position: fly half
  • International career: 1920-1932
  • Nickname: TS
    Tom Lawton is widely regarded as one of Australia’s all-time greats as well as a fine Wallaby captain and coach. His representative career lasted nearly 14 years, during which time he played for Queensland, New South Wales, Australia, Oxford University (winning three Blues) and the Barbarians. He captained all the teams he played for, from Queensland to Australia. He was an accomplished ball handler and his kicking, both tactical and at goal, was regarded as flawless. He played in 33 of the 35 matches on the 1927 Waratahs tour (which was eventually recognised by the ARU as a full Australian tour) scoring an Australian record of 124 points. He led Australia in the 1929 Bledisloe Cup, wining all three Tests against New Zealand – an Australian first against the All Blacks. He also captained Australia against the 1930 Lions, leading the Wallabies to a rare and satisfying win (6-5). He was the grandfather of two Australian international front-rowers Rob (prop) and Tom (hooker). Inducted into the Wallaby Hall of Fame.
  • 2013 Inductee: John Edward Thornett MBE
  • Born: 1935 in Grifith, New South Wales, Australia
  • Position: flanker, second row, prop
  • International career: 1955-1967
    The oldest and most successful of three exceptionally gifted rugby-playing brothers (Dick and Ken are the other two). He played international rugby in four different positions flank forward, number 8, second row and prop – though he began his first grade career at centre with Sydney University. He played his first representative game for NSW against Queensland in 1955, the year he made his international debut against New Zealand. He was appointed captain for the New Zealand tour in 1962 and led his country in 16 of his 37 Tests. Under his captaincy Australia became the first nation in 67 years to defeat South Africa in consecutive Tests during the 1963 drawn series. In 1965 he led Australia to a magnificent 2-0 win over the visiting Springboks and played against the Lions, both in 1959 and 1966. In 1964 he captained an international selection against South Africa at the 75th anniversary of South African Rugby Board and was voted as one of the five best players in the world by the NZ Rugby Almanac. He was inducted into the Sport Australia Hall of Fame in 1985 and the Wallaby Hall of Fame in 2007. He was made an MBE for services to rugby in NSW.
  • 2013 Inductee:Ken William Catchpole OAM
  • Born: 1939 in Paddington, New South Wales, Australia
  • Position: scrum half
  • Nickname: Catchy
  • International career: 1961-1968
    One of the world’s finest scrum halves he played for Randwick Under 21s, before he made his representative debut for New South Wales at the age of 19, in a memorable 18-14 win over the 1959 Lions. Two years later in 1961 he made his international debut as captain of Australia in a three-Test series against Fiji. His partnership with Phil Hawthorne became world-famous as the two became the hinge of the successful Wallaby touring side of 1966/67, playing a brand of attacking rugby which has rarely been emulated since. He was forced to stop playing at 28 following a career-ending injury against New Zealand. Overall he won 27 international caps of which 13 were as captain. He was awarded the Medal of the Order of Australia (OAM), inducted into the Sport Australia Hall of Fame and was one of the five original inductees to the Wallaby Hall of Fame. He was also inducted into the Wall of Fame at Twickenham and was voted as one of the four original “Invincibles” of Australian rugby at a ceremony in Sydney this year.
  • 2013 Inductee: Mark Gordon Ella AM
  • Born: 1959, in Surry Hills, New South Wales, Australia
  • Position: fly-half
  • International career: 1980-1984
    The most successful of the three rugby-playing Ella brothers, the others being his twin brother Glen and the youngest of the three Gary, who graced the rugby fields of Australia and the world during the 1980s. A one-club player he played for Randwick RFC in Sydney. The 21-year old made his international debut in the boiling cauldron of Bledisloe Cup rugby in the first Test of the 1980 series against New Zealand, when he became overnight a household name. Described by a newspaper as, “the detonator which explodes the brilliance of the Australian backs at critical moment”, he made 26 appearances for NSW and won a total of 25 caps in his brief international career. He captained Australia during the 1982 tour of New Zealand, the first Aboriginal player to captain Australia in any sport, before he prematurely ended his playing career after the 1984 Grand Slam tour of the British Isles, in which he scored a try in each of the four Tests. The journalists had run out of adjectives to describe the inspired options of this mercurial genius: his anticipation, the artistry of his game and the solidity of his defence; indeed, the combination of skills that enabled Mark Ella to perform at stratospheric level, is quite unique and definitely uncanny. He was one of the five original inductees of the Wallaby Rugby Hall of Fame and was voted as one of the four original “Invincibles” of Australian rugby.
  • 2013 Inductee: David Ian Campese AM
  • Born: 1962 in Queanbeyan, New South Wales, Australia
  • Position: full back and wing
  • International career: 1982-1996
  • Nickname: Campo
    David Campese played Rugby League until the age of 16 but in 1979, he started playing rugby union for the local club Queanbeyan Whites. He made an instant impact playing both at full back and wing three-quarters for his club, ACT, NSW, Australia Under 21, Australia and the Barbarians. His precocious talent was rewarded when he made his international debut at the age of 19 against New Zealand in 1982, the first of his career total of 101 caps, an Australian record at the time of his retirement after 14 years in the game. Regarded as one of the world’s great rugby entertainers and Australia’s all-time greats he was a member of the RWC 1991 winning team, when he was voted the Player of the Tournament. He scored 64 Test tries, a world record at the time of his retirement but subsequently broken by Japan’s D. Ohata. In addition to Queanbeyan Whites he also played club rugby for Randwick DRFC, as well as Petrarca Padua and Amatori Milan in Italy. He also represented New South Wales, and was selected by the Barbarians. An accomplished Sevens player he played for Australia in Hong Kong, winning the tournament in 1983 and captained his country to a bronze medal in the Commonwealth Games in 1998. He is a member of the Order of Australia (AM)
  • 2013 Inductee: George Musarurwa Gregan AM
  • Born: 1973 in Lusaka, Zambia
  • Position: scrum half
  • International career: 1994-2007
  • Nickname: Webster
    Arguably, one of the finest scrum halves to represent Australia in an impressive gallery of greats that includes Ken Catchpole, Nick Farr-Jones, Des Connor, John Hipwell et al. Gregan is, at the time of his induction, the world’s most capped player with 139 appearances for his country, having began his career when the Game was still amateur. He played for the ACT Brumbies since the formation of the franchise in 1996 until 2007, winning two Super Rugby titles in 2001 and 2004. He showed early promise when selected for the Australia Under 21 and Sevens teams. He made his international debut in the first Test against a strong Italian team in 1994 and played a big role, with his try-saving tackle on Jeff Wilson, in Australia’s success in the Bledisloe Cup that year. He was briefly appointed captain of the Wallabies in 1997, the first of his 59 tests as skipper, an Australian record. However, it was John Eales who led Australia the glory of the RWC 1999, when they defeated France in the final. Gregan played in all three Tests against the 2001 Lions, as Australia won the series. He was the Australian captain for the RWC 2003, when England defeated the hosts in the final and played his last match for the Wallabies four years later, when Australia were knocked out by England in the quarterfinals of the RWC 2007.
  • 2013 Inductee: Robert Lionel Seddon and the 1888 “English” Footballers
  • Born: 1860 in Salford
  • Died: in an accident in 1888 in West Maitland, Australia
  • International career: 1886-1888
  • Position: forward
  • Nickname: Bob
    One hundred and twenty-five years have passed since the 1888 tour of Australia and New Zealand by a team selected from the British Isles – the first ever rugby tour from the Home Unions to the southern hemisphere, a pioneering venture, which had a significant impact on the establishment and expansion of the Game in the then colonies and the world. Twenty-seven-year old England forward Bob Seddon, who had won three caps in 1887 (against Wales, Ireland and Scotland) was elected captain of the touring side, a private venture organised and managed by three leading England cricketers and promoters Alfred Shaw, Arthur Shrewsbury and James Lillywhite. The team, who were denied official status by the Rugby Football Union, left Britain on 8 March 1888 and returned home eight months later, on 11 November 1888. The 20-strong selection, known as “The English footballers”, (in fact a combination of English, Scottish and Welsh (one)), played a total of 53 matches of which 35 were rugby football and 18 Victorian football (Australian Rules). They won 27 of the 35 rugby matches, with six draws and only two defeats, though no Test match as such was played. During their stay in Queensland, Seddon tragically died in a boating accident on River Hunter at West Maitland and Andrew Stoddart, a famous cricketer and rugby player, took over the captaincy.
  • 2013 Inductee: Dr. David Bedell – Sivright
  • Born: 1880 in Edinburgh
  • Died: 1915 during the Gallipoli campaign
  • International Career 1900-1908
  • Position – second-row forward
  • Nickname “Darkie”
    A product of the remarkable Scottish Schools system at the turn of the 19th century (he learned the game at the Fettes School), which produced a large number of Scottish internationals. He played for and captained both the Edinburgh and Cambridge Universities, where he studied for a medical degree. He won four Blues during his time at Cambridge and made his international debut for Scotland at the age of 19, the first of his 22 caps. A player of enormous physicality and resilience he toured South Africa with the 1903 Lions and was appointed captain of the 1904 tourists to Australia and New Zealand. Injury prevented the marauding forward from adding to his one Lions cap he won in Australia, but the 1904 Lions have established a number of records, which lasted for more that a century. In Australia Bedell- Sivright’s men won all their 14 matches including the three Tests, scoring 265 points and conceding 51 against, the first Lions side to finish the Australian leg of the tour unbeaten. After the tour, captivated by the beauty of Australia, he decided to settle in Sydney, but after one year, unlike his teammate Blair Swanell, he changed his mind and returned home to pursue his medical studies. At the outbreak of the First World War he joined the Royal Navy as a surgeon and was killed at Galipolli in 1915.
  • 2013 Inductee: Bleddyn Llewellyn Williams MBE & Dr Jack Matthews OBE
  • (BW) Born: 1923 in Taff’s Well, Wales, Died: 2009
  • (JM) Born: 1920 in Bridgend, Wales Died: 2012
  • International career: (BW) 1947-1955; (JM) 1947-1951
  • Position: Centres
  • (BW) Nickname: Prince of Centres
    The two Welsh centres formed a uniquely complementary and successful partnership at club, national team and Lions levels after the Second World War. They played together for Cardiff and Wales and they both captained their club and the country. They also played for the 1950 Lions in both New Zealand and Australia. Bleddyn Williams, the third of eight rugby-playing brothers, made his international debut against England in 1947 at fly half, the first of his 22 Welsh caps – the other 21 were at centre. He captained Wales in five tests, winning all five, and remains to this date the only Welsh captain to claim 100% success record. He was vice-captain of the 1950 Lions and played in five of the six Tests (injury prevented him from playing in the first Test). With Karl Mullen injured he captained the Lions in three of the six tests, (two in New Zealand and one in Australia.) He became a very successful rugby commentator and was awarded an MBE for services to rugby. Dr. Jack Matthews made his international debut in a non-cap Victory International against France, one of the five War Internationals he played in. Described as one of the fiercest tacklers in the game, he won 17 caps for Wales and six for the 1950 Lions (four in New Zealand and two in Australia). He captained both the Cardiff club and Wales and became the first Lions team doctor with the 1980 tourists to South Africa
  • 2013 Inductee: Alfred Ronald “Ronnie” Dawson
  • Born: 1932 in Dublin, Ireland
  • Position: hooker
  • International career: 1958-1965
  • Nickname: Ronnie
    An architect by trade, Dawson played for the Wanderers club in Dublin, Leinster province, Ireland and the Barbarians. He won the first of his 27 Irish caps against Australia in 1958 and was selected for the Lions in 1959. An outstanding leader of men he captained his club, province, country and the 1959 Lions on their tour of Australia (six matches), New Zealand (25 matches) and Canada (two matches). A keen Barbarian he played 22 times for the club without fixed abode and captained them on several occasions, including their historic win over South Africa in 1961 – the only defeat of the tour. He made the first of his 17 Lions appearances against Victoria, leading the Lions in six Test matches, a record since equalled by Martin Johnson. The 1959 Lions played a similar attacking brand of rugby pioneered by the 1950 tourists, running the ball at every opportunity. They scored 842 points in 33 matches, a record for a Lions team. Dawson was unavailable to tour South Africa with the Lions in 1962, but was appointed assistant manager/coach of the 1968 Lions captained by Tom Kiernan. He became an Irish and Lions selector and was appointed as the first coach of Ireland in 1969. He became President of Wanderers, Leinster, the Irish Rugby Football Union and chaired the IRB Council, on which he served for 20 years (1974-1994). He was the member of the first RWC Organising Committee. He was received with the IRB Vernon Pugh Award for Distinguished Service in 2004.
  • 2013 Inductee: Andrew Gavin Hastings OBE
  • Born: 1962 in Edinburgh, Scotland
  • Position: Full back
  • International career: 1986-1995
  • Nickname: Big Gav
    Before he made his international debut he played alongside his brother Scott for the Scottish Universities against their English counterparts in 1984 and was described by his coach Bill Dickinson as a “great player of the future.” He fulfilled the prophecy of the great coach and two years later he made his Scotland debut against France in 1986, winning the first of his 61 international caps. He played in three Rugby World Cup tournaments, starting in 13 matches and scoring a total of 227 points, a RWC record until it was bettered by Jonny Wilkinson. He captained the winning Cambridge University in the Varsity match in 1985 and helped Scotland win the Grand Slam in 1990. He played for the Watsonians RFC in Edinburgh, London Scottish and the Barbarians. His first selection for the British & Irish Lions was for the IRB Centenary match against the Rest of the World in Cardiff in 1986. He played a total of 16 matches on two Lions tours (plus two one-off internationals), winning, in addition to his debut for the 1986 Lions selection, seven more Lions caps – three against Australia in 1989, three against New Zealand in 1993, as well as a selection against France in the match organised to celebrate the Bicentenary of the French Revolution in Paris in 1989. He captained Scotland on 20 occasions and led the Lions on their 1993 tour of New Zealand, playing in nine of the matches, including the three Tests. He scored a total of 192 points during his Lions career, of which 66 points were against Australian opposition.
  • 2009 Inductee: Ian McGeechan

    His name is synonymous with the Lions, Ian McGeechan having gone on seven tours, experiencing series wins over South Africa as a player and coach.

  • 2009 Inductee: William J McBride

    Willie John McBride toured South Africa three times as a player with the Lions, the last time as captain of the “Invincibles” in 1974.

  • 2009 Inductee: Dr Syd Millar

    Syd Millar’s association with the British & Irish Lions spans six decades and includes two tours to South Africa as a player, one as coach and one as manager.

  • 2009 Inductee: Frederik CH du Preez

    South African flank forward Frik du Preez played eight Tests against the Lions across the 1962 and 1968 tours and was never on the losing side.

  • 2009 Inductee: Sir Anthony O’Reilly

    Ireland wing Tony O’Reilly made his Lions debut while still a teenager in 1955 and scored a record 37 tries across his two tours during the fifties.

  • 2009 Inductee: Clifford I Morgan

    A true legend of Welsh rugby, Cliff Morgan was labelled ‘Morgan the Magnificent’ by South African press after leading the Lions to a famous win in 1955.

  • 2009 Inductee: Bennie Osler

    Bennie Osler made his South African debut against the Lions and went on to play in 17 consecutive Tests for the Springboks.

  • 2009 Inductee: Barry H Heatlie

    Barry Heatlie captained South Africa to their first ever Test win in 1896 and again in the third test of 1903 which won them them the Series against the British

  • 2009 Inductee: William E Maclagan

    Bill Maclagan was appointed captain of the first British team to tour South Africa back in 1891 and played in 19 of the 20 matches on the trip.

  • 2008 Inductee: Philippe Sella

    France legend Philippe Sella is widely recognised as one of the finest players of his generation and the world’s best centre of the 1980s and 1990s.

  • 2008 Inductee: Hugo Porta

    Dubbed the ‘magician of Argentine rugby’, Hugo Porta enjoyed an international career spanning 19 years and is the Pumas’ leading point scorer.

    • 2006 Inductee: Rugby School

      Lawrence Sheriff left his considerable fortune to fund a school for the children of Rugby and nearby areas, one that now bears his coat of arms.

    • 2006: Current Rugby School Headmaster speech

      The speech given by Headmaster Patrick Derham, the Rugby School representative, at the induction of the School and William Webb Ellis into the IRB Hall of Fame.

    • 2006: The Rugby School Legacy – The Laws

      Rugby School has left a considerable legacy in terms of the Laws of the Game, terminology, half time change of ends and the try.

    • 2006: The Rugby School Legacy – The Ball

      A boot and shoe manufacturer in Rugby is credited with making the earliest rugby balls to be used in the School foot-ball game.

    • 2006: The Rugby School Legacy – The Cap

      The cap became a sign of attainment at Rugby School and was subsequently adopted as such by rugby clubs, then England and other Unions around the world.

    • 2006: The Bloxam Controversy

      It was Matthew Bloxham, a contemporary of William Webb Ellis at Rugby School in the 1820s, who claimed in 1876 that Webb Ellis had run with the ball first.

    • 2006: Tom Brown’s School Days

      Read Thomas Hughes’ account of how football was played at Rugby School in the early 19th Century, immortalised in ‘Tom Brown’s School Days’.

    • 2006: Old Rugbeian Investigation

      In order to investigate the circumstances of the William Webb Ellis ‘exploit’, a committee of Old Rugbeians was appointed in 1895.

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      Hall of Fame Inductees

      • 2014 Inductee: Gill BurnsFormer England captain Gill Burns played in four Women’s Rugby World Cups, including the win in 1994. 

      • IRB Hall of Fame 2014 Inductee: Fred AllenFred ‘The Needle’ Allen had a 100 per cent record as All Blacks coach with 14 wins from 14 Tests in charge. 

      • IRB Hall of Fame 2014 Inductee: Don Clarke
      • A legend of Waikato rugby, Don Clarke played 31 Tests among his 89 matches for New Zealand. 
      • IRB Hall of Fame 2014 Inductee: Sir Colin Meads
      • Widely regarded as one a true icon of New Zealand and world rugby. 
      • IRB Hall of Fame 2013 Inductee: Thomas Lawton
      • Tom Lawton is widely regarded as one of Australia’s all-time greats as well as a fine Wallaby captain and coach. 
      • 2013 Inductee: Ken William Catchpole
      • One of the world’s finest scrum halves, Ken Catchpole won 27 caps for Australia before injury cut short his career at 28. 
      • IRB Hall of Fame 2013 Inductee: Mark Gordon Ella
      • The most successful of the three rugby-playing Ella brothers who graced the fields of Australia and the world during the 1980s. 
      • 2013 Inductee: George Musarurwa Gregan
      • The most capped player in world rugby, George Gregan is a Rugby World Cup winner with Australia. 
      • IRB Hall of Fame 2013 Inductee: John Edward Thornett
      • The oldest and most successful of three exceptionally gifted rugby-playing brothers, he played international rugby in four positions. 
      • IRB Hall of Fame 2013 Inductee: Robert Seddon & 1888 teamOne hundred and twenty-five years have passed since Robert Seddon led the first touring side to the southern hemisphere.
  • IRB Hall of Fame 2013 Inductee: Dr David Bedell-Sivright
  • A player of enormous physicality and resilience he toured with the Lions twice, captaining them to Australia and New Zealand in 1904.
  • IRB Hall of Fame 2013 Inductee: B Williams & Dr J Matthews
  • Bleddyn Williams and Jack Matthews formed a successful centre partnership for Cardiff, Wales and the Lions after the Second World War.
  • IRB Hall of Fame 2013 Inductee: Alfred Ronald Dawson
  • An outstanding leader of men, he captained his club, province, country and the 1959 Lions on their tour of Australia, New Zealand and Canada
  • 2013 Inductee: Andrew Gavin Hastings
  • Described as “great player of the future” before making his international debut, Gavin Hastings fulfilled the prophecy of his former coach.
  • IRB Hall of Fame 2012 Inductee: Waisale Serevi
  • ‘The King of Sevens’, Waisale Serevi’s name is synonymous with the shorter version of the Game, having excelled for Fiji Sevens.
  • IRB Hall of Fame 2012 Inductee: Vladimir Ilyushin
  • A legend of Soviet Union aviation, Vladimir Ilyushin was also instrumental in the formation of the Soviet Rugby Federation.
  • IRB Hall of Fame 2012 Inductee: Alfred St George Hamersley
  • Alfred St George Hamersley played in the first ever rugby international match for England against Scotland on 27 March 1871.
  • IRB Hall of Fame 2012 Inductees: Richard and Kennedy Tsimba
  • Two pioneers of rugby in Zimbabwe, brothers Richard and Kennedy Tsimba, have been inducted into the IRB Hall of Fame.
  • IRB Hall of Fame 2012 Inductees: The USA Olympic team
  • The USA teams which won the last two Olympic rugby medals, in 1920 and 1924, have been inducted into the IRB Hall of Fame.
  • IRB Hall of Fame 2012 Inductee: The Romania Olympic Team
  • The 1924 Olympic team won Romania’s first ever medal and inspired generations of Rugby players in that country.
  • IRB Hall of Fame 2012 Inductee: Yoshihiro Sakata
    Japanese legend Yoshihiro Sakata was voted one of the best players in the world by the NZ Almanac in the late 1960s.
  • IRB Hall of Fame 2012 Inductees: Ian and Donald Campbell
    Brothers Ian and Donald Campbell both played for Chile and the former is widely regarded as the father of Chile rugby.
  • IRB Hall of Fame 2012 Inductee: Gordon Tietjens
    Gordon Tietjens is peerless in Sevens, having been at the helm of New Zealand since 1994 and won countless Series titles and gold medals.
  • IRB Hall of Fame 2011 Inductee: John William Smit
    John Smit was South Africa captain for their second Rugby World Cup triumph in 2007.
  • IRB Hall of Fame 2011 Inductee: Martin Osbourne Johnson
    Martin Johnson led England to their finest hour in Rugby World Cup history, victory in the 2003 tournament in Australia.
  • IRB Hall of Fame 2011 Inductee: Agustín Pichot
    The talisman of Argentine rugby, Agustín Pichot played in four Rugby World Cups and captained the Pumas to a best finish of third in 2007.
  • IRB Hall of Fame 2011 Inductee: Brian Pala Lima
    A legend of Samoan rugby, Brian Lima is to date the only man to play in five Rugby World Cups.
  • IRB Hall of Fame 2011 Inductee: Jake White
    Jake White coached South Africa to their second Rugby World Cup triumph in 2007.
  • IRB Hall of Fame 2011 Inductee: Jonah Tali Lomu
    Few will forget the impact that New Zealand’s giant wing Jonah Lomu had on Rugby World Cup 1995.
  • IRB Hall of Fame 2011 Inductee: Sir Clive Ronald Woodward
    Clive Woodward was the coach when England became the first northern hemisphere nation to lift the Webb Ellis Cup at RWC 2003.

 

  • IRB Hall of Fame 2011 Inductee: Gareth Lloyd Rees
    Former Canada fly half and captain Gareth Rees was the first player to take part in four Rugby World Cup tournaments.
  • IRB Hall of Fame 2011 Inductee: Roderick Macqueen
    Rod Macqueen coached Australia to their second Rugby World Cup success in 1999.
  • IRB Hall of Fame 2011 Inductee: George Moir Christie
    Kitch Christie was South Africa coach when they won Rugby World Cup 1995 on home soil.
  • IRB Hall of Fame 2011 Inductee: Jacobus Francois Pienaar
    The image of Francois Pienaar receiving the Webb Ellis Cup from Nelson Mandela is one of the most iconic in Rugby World Cup history.
  • IRB Hall of Fame 2011 Inductee: Robert Dwyer
    Bob Dwyer coached Australia to Rugby World Cup success in 1991.
  • IRB Hall of Fame 2011 Inductee: Nicholas Farr-Jones
    Nick Farr-Jones was Australia’s captain for their first Rugby World Cup triumph in 1991.
  • IRB Hall of Fame 2011 Inductee: Sir Brian James Lochore
    Sir Brian Lochore was coach of New Zealand for their first Rugby World Cup triumph in 1987.
  • IRB Hall of Fame 2011 Inductee: David Edward Kirk
    David Kirk was the first captain to lift the Webb Ellis Cup after New Zealand’s success on home soil in 1987.
  • IRB Hall of Fame 2011 Inductee: John Kendall-Carpenter
    Former England captain John Kendall-Carpenter was the third RWC 1987 Director, responsible for delivering the tournament on time and budget.
  • IRB Hall of Fame 2011 Inductee: Sir Nicholas Michael Shehadie
    Sir Nicholas Shehadie spent months on the road convincing the reluctant northern hemisphere Unions of the value of a Rugby World Cup.
  • IRB Hall of Fame 2011 Inductee: Richard Littlejohn
    Richard Littlejohn was instrumental in leading the IRB to make the decision to hold a Rugby World Cup.
  • IRB Hall of Fame 2011 Inductee: Dr Ian Roger Vanderfield
    A former referee, Dr Vanderfield was chair of the historic meeting in Paris where the decision to hold a Rugby World Cup was made in 1985.
  • IRB Hall of Fame 2010 Inductee: Cameron Michael H Gibson
    The fourth most capped Lion with 12 Tests, Mike Gibson was the most capped player in world rugby at the time of retirement.
  • IRB Hall of Fame 2010 Inductee: WP Carpmael & Barbarian FC
    Founded by the visionary William Percy Carpmael, the Barbarian Football Club is unique in Rugby terms.
  • IRB Hall of Fame 2010 Inductee: Dave Gallaher
    Dave Gallaher captained the first official New Zealand tour of the British Isles, France and USA, the so called ‘Originals’.
  • IRB Hall of Fame 2010 Inductee: Frank Hancock and Cardiff RFC
    Under the captaincy of Frank Hancock, Cardiff RFC pioneered the revolutionary four-back system adopted by Wales in the 1885 season.
  • IRB Hall of Fame 2010 Inductee: Harry Vassall & Alan Rotherham
    Alan Rotherham and Harry Vassall are credited with pioneering the passing game and three-man backline, which became widespread in the 1880s.
  • IRB Hall of Fame 2010 Inductee: Serge Blanco
    Venezuelan-born Serge Blanco is a name synonomous with French rugby, the full back amassing a then record 93 Tests over 11 years.
  • IRB Hall of Fame 2010 Inductee: Lucien Mias
    A great innovator and thinker, French legend Lucian Mias was known as Docteur Pack and described as the captain of captains.
  • IRB Hall of Fame 2010 Inductees: Andre and Guy Boniface
    Described as the first superstars of the French game, brothers Andre and Guy Boniface made 83 Test appearances between them.
  • IRB Hall of Fame 2010 Inductee: Jean Prat
    Known as Monsieur Rugby, legendary French star Jean Prat was the first player in international rugby to reach 50 caps.
  • IRB Hall of Fame 2009 Inductee: Ian McGeechan
    His name is synonymous with the Lions, Ian McGeechan having gone on seven tours, experiencing series wins over South Africa as a player …
  • IRB Hall of Fame 2009 Inductee: William J McBride
    Willie John McBride toured South Africa three times as a player with the Lions, the last time as captain of the “Invincibles” in 1974.
  • IRB Hall of Fame 2009 Inductee: Dr Syd Millar
    Syd Millar’s association with the British & Irish Lions spans six decades and includes two tours to South Africa as a player, one as…
  • IRB Hall of Fame 2009 Inductee: Frederik CH du Preez
    South African flank forward Frik du Preez played eight Tests against the Lions across the 1962 and 1968 tours and was never on the losin…
  • IRB Hall of Fame 2009 Inductee: Sir Anthony O’Reilly
    Ireland wing Tony O’Reilly made his Lions debut while still a teenager in 1955 and scored a record 37 tries across his two tours during …
  • IRB Hall of Fame 2009 Inductee: Clifford I Morgan
    A true legend of Welsh rugby, Cliff Morgan was labelled ‘Morgan the Magnificent’ by South African press after leading the Lions to a fam…
  • IRB Hall of Fame 2009 Inductee: Bennie Osler
    Bennie Osler made his South African debut against the Lions and went on to play in 17 consecutive Tests for the Springboks.
  • IRB Hall of Fame 2009 Inductee: Barry H Heatlie
    Barry Heatlie captained South Africa to their first ever Test win in 1896 and again in the third test of 1903 which won them them the Se…
  • IRB Hall of Fame 2009 Inductee: William E Maclagan
    Bill Maclagan was appointed captain of the first British team to tour South Africa back in 1891 and played in 19 of the 20 matches on th…
  • IRB Hall of Fame 2008 Inductee: Philippe Sella
    France legend Philippe Sella is widely recognised as one of the finest players of his generation and the world’s best centre of the 1980…
  • IRB Hall of Fame 2008 Inductee: Hugo Porta
    Dubbed the ‘magician of Argentine rugby’, Hugo Porta enjoyed an international career spanning 19 years and is the Pumas’ leading point s…
  • IRB Hall of Fame 2008 Inductee: Dr Jack Kyle
    Regarded as the greatest ever Irish player, Dr John Wilson Kyle was a key figure in Ireland’s Grand Slam winning team of 1948.
  • IRB Hall of Fame 2008 Inductee: Melrose RFC and Ned Haig
    Little did Ned Haig and David Sanderson realise that their money-spinning idea for a Sevens tournament in 1883 would go on to become a w…
  • IRB Hall of Fame 2008 Inductee: J Warbrick & 1888 Natives Team
    Joseph Astbury Warbick coached and captained the 1888 Natives Team on their record 107-match tour of New Zealand, Australia and the Brit…
  • IRB Hall of Fame 2007 Inductee: Sir Wilson Whineray
    Sir Wilson Whineray played with distinction for a number of New Zealand provinces and the national side in a sparkling rugby career.
  • IRB Hall of Fame 2007 Inductee: Dr Danie Craven
    Dr. Daniel Hartman Craven captained and coached South Africa and was Chairman of the IRB Council in 1962, 1973 and 1979.
  • IRB Hall of Fame 2007 Inductee: Gareth Edwards
    Gareth Edwards is a name synonymous with Welsh and British Lions rugby history.
  • IRB Hall of Fame 2007 Inductee: John Eales
    A natural leader, former Australia captain John Eales is one of a select group of players to have won the Rugby World Cup on two occasions.
  • IRB Hall of Fame 2007 Inductee: Baron Pierre de Coubertin
    The founder of the modern Olympic Games and a passionate proponent of rugby.
  • IRB Hall of Fame 2007: New inductees into IRB Hall of FameFive new inductees are admitted into the IRB Hall of Fame at the 2007 IRB Awards ceremony in Paris on Sunday 21 October. 

  • IRB Hall of Fame 2006: Rugby School and William Webb EllisThe first to be inducted into the IRB Hall of Fame was Rugby School in Warwickshire and its most celebrated pupil William Webb Ellis. 

  • 2006 Inductee: William Webb Ellis
    A biography of William Webb Ellis, Rugby School in Warwickshire’s most celebrated pupil.
  • IRB Hall of Fame 2006 Inductee: Rugby School
    Lawrence Sheriff left his considerable fortune to fund a school for the children of Rugby and nearby areas, one that now bears his coat …
  • IRB Hall of Fame 2006: Current Rugby School Headmaster speech
    The speech given by Headmaster Patrick Derham, the Rugby School representative, at the induction of the School and William Webb Ellis in…
  • IRB Hall of Fame 2006: The Rugby School Legacy – The Laws
    Rugby School has left a considerable legacy in terms of the Laws of the Game, terminology, half time change of ends and the try.
  • IRB Hall of Fame 2006: The Rugby School Legacy – The Ball
    A boot and shoe manufacturer in Rugby is credited with making the earliest rugby balls to be used in the School foot-ball game.
  • IRB Hall of Fame 2006: The Rugby School Legacy – The Cap
    The cap became a sign of attainment at Rugby School and was subsequently adopted as such by rugby clubs, then England and other Unions a…
  • IRB Hall of Fame 2006: The Bloxam Controversy
    It was Matthew Bloxham, a contemporary of William Webb Ellis at Rugby School in the 1820s, who claimed in 1876 that Webb Ellis had run w…
  • IRB Hall of Fame 2006: Tom Brown’s School Days
    Read Thomas Hughes’ account of how football was played at Rugby School in the early 19th Century, immortalised in ‘Tom Brown’s School Days’.
  • IRB Hall of Fame 2006: Old Rugbeian Investigation
    In order to investigate the circumstances of the William Webb Ellis ‘exploit’, a committee of Old Rugbeians was appointed in 1895.